Ad/Graph Thesis – Drawing to a Close

Last week, I promised that I'd make an enormous amount of progress leading up to this post. And that I did.

The exhibit is almost completely finished, save for a few minor antenna decorations, a sign, and some of the items that will go inside. All in all, though, the bulk of the work is over.

As suggested above, I've begun to shift my focus to populating each of the compartments with items, sounds, images, and so on. My goal is to fill as many as possible by Thursday in order to give the faculty enough examples. If all goes well, my project might be accepted into the show, and I can put the finishing touches on things.

Recording in the sound booth.

Painting the satellite dish.

Assembling the doors.

Attaching the side panels.

Piecing everything together.

I'm almost there. I can't wait to see what happens. Regardless of the outcome, I'm ecstatic with everything that I've already accomplished.

Ad/Graph Thesis – Several Developments

In my last post, I discussed ideas for execution, and I'm thrilled to say that I've nailed down much of what that will entail.

I plan to construct an exhibit that loosely resembles a Voyager probe, and features a variety of different "human experiences" in individual containers. From programmable, light-sensitive speakers to photographs to physical objects, I'm working on as many kinds of elements as I can, with an overwhelming majority coming from surveys I've conducted. At the show, visitors are invited to explore them freely.

As far as materials and technology go, I've been looking online for things that might work well with this project. I've found a few kinds of small containers, a few easy-to-program speakers, and some other relatively affordable materials. I've also been creating a master list of the "human experiences" and organizing them based on which senses they appeal to the most.

The light-sensitive speaker. Photo Credit: Amazon

The light-sensitive speaker. Photo Credit: Amazon

Photo Credit: Staples

Photo Credit: Staples

This is what Lone Signal used to transmit its signals. It's big. Photo Credit: Lone Signal

This is what Lone Signal used to transmit its signals. It's big.
Photo Credit: Lone Signal

Not all is well, though; I recently discovered that the Lone Signal service is currently unavailable. According to an official Tumblr post, the funding process has become difficult to sustain, and the group is currently searching for alternatives. I also sent them a tweet to reach them directly, which should hopefully explain when their service might resume. With that being said, I've begun searching for alternatives, but every one I've found has ultimately met the same fate.

Worst case scenario, I find some other way to aggregate people's contributions at the show, with the promise of sending them out when Lone Signal or a similar service becomes available.

My contact through Earth Tapestry also returned to the States recently, so I'll probably arrange for a Skype call with him soon. I'm also going to reach out to some Industrial Design students to see if anyone on campus is interested in helping me construct this thing. Expect some schematics soon!

Ad/Graph Thesis – Emails and Execution

Last week, I explained what my concept is, and showed a sketch for what I envisioned the execution to look like. Upon sharing that work with the class, I've since been given some suggestions and returned to the drawing board, in an attempt to refine what this project may become.

As far as other ideas go, I've been thinking about slight variations of my original execution:


Isolating the Elements
A few students have suggested that I place greater emphasis on the discovery and rediscovery of the various things on display. One idea is to place these items in separate containers, possibly marked in binary or pictorial graphics. This would entice visitors to examine each element in its own regard, be it a texture, smell, image, sound, or written message. They might also be able to add their own contributions, although this might be logistically challenging.

A Human Element
I could create a secondary display that compliments the original space probe idea. The display could be a suggestion of a human, either in the form of a poster or a sculpture. Regardless, visitors would be encouraged to choose elements from the probe and place them on the human, in a collaborative attempt to create what we believe to be defining aspects of our humanity.

Sending Out the Message
This area is still a little rough, but whatever people deem valuable could be photographed, collectively donated and installed somewhere in the school, sent up in a small model rocket, or some other outlet. It becomes difficult, however, if I end up literally sending things up into the sky, because I've severely limited by what I can afford to lose and possibly break (e.g., I would never send up a $400 iPad). I've also been toying with the idea of transmitting this image into the sky using a laser and binary/morse code. Additionally, I've thought about utilizing a project like Lone Signal, a crowdfunded group that sends images and text messages into space for very little money. 

This aspect of the project is certainly the most challenging, because I want visitors to really feel convinced that their ideas are valued.

Sending out a curated selection of items in a rocket would be pretty cool, but is it safe? Photo Credit: Robotroom.com.

Sending out a curated selection of items in a rocket would be pretty cool, but is it safe? Photo Credit: Robotroom.com.

Imagine if every element on display was encased in its own capsule, complete with pictorial markings on it? Photo Credit: Dahou.com.

Imagine if every element on display was encased in its own capsule, complete with pictorial markings on it? Photo Credit: Dahou.com.

For just $0.99, you can send an image and three text messages deep into space! Photo Credit: Lone Signal.

For just $0.99, you can send an image and three text messages deep into space!
Photo Credit: Lone Signal.

In other news, I received a couple of emails from professionals and experts, one of whom is the director of Earth Tapestry, the project I've mentioned in the past. We had a brief exchange through email, and I plan to conduct a Skype call with him in about a week's time. It will be great to hear from someone whose project is also about sourcing people's opinions on significant aspects of our world.

By next week, I need to make sure I'm set on what my execution will be; I have to create something in the end, after all. I also hope to continue sourcing answers for my "big question," because everyone has an opinion on what is worth representing us.