Ad/Graph Thesis – Emails and Execution

Last week, I explained what my concept is, and showed a sketch for what I envisioned the execution to look like. Upon sharing that work with the class, I've since been given some suggestions and returned to the drawing board, in an attempt to refine what this project may become.

As far as other ideas go, I've been thinking about slight variations of my original execution:


Isolating the Elements
A few students have suggested that I place greater emphasis on the discovery and rediscovery of the various things on display. One idea is to place these items in separate containers, possibly marked in binary or pictorial graphics. This would entice visitors to examine each element in its own regard, be it a texture, smell, image, sound, or written message. They might also be able to add their own contributions, although this might be logistically challenging.

A Human Element
I could create a secondary display that compliments the original space probe idea. The display could be a suggestion of a human, either in the form of a poster or a sculpture. Regardless, visitors would be encouraged to choose elements from the probe and place them on the human, in a collaborative attempt to create what we believe to be defining aspects of our humanity.

Sending Out the Message
This area is still a little rough, but whatever people deem valuable could be photographed, collectively donated and installed somewhere in the school, sent up in a small model rocket, or some other outlet. It becomes difficult, however, if I end up literally sending things up into the sky, because I've severely limited by what I can afford to lose and possibly break (e.g., I would never send up a $400 iPad). I've also been toying with the idea of transmitting this image into the sky using a laser and binary/morse code. Additionally, I've thought about utilizing a project like Lone Signal, a crowdfunded group that sends images and text messages into space for very little money. 

This aspect of the project is certainly the most challenging, because I want visitors to really feel convinced that their ideas are valued.

Sending out a curated selection of items in a rocket would be pretty cool, but is it safe? Photo Credit: Robotroom.com.

Sending out a curated selection of items in a rocket would be pretty cool, but is it safe? Photo Credit: Robotroom.com.

Imagine if every element on display was encased in its own capsule, complete with pictorial markings on it? Photo Credit: Dahou.com.

Imagine if every element on display was encased in its own capsule, complete with pictorial markings on it? Photo Credit: Dahou.com.

For just $0.99, you can send an image and three text messages deep into space! Photo Credit: Lone Signal.

For just $0.99, you can send an image and three text messages deep into space!
Photo Credit: Lone Signal.

In other news, I received a couple of emails from professionals and experts, one of whom is the director of Earth Tapestry, the project I've mentioned in the past. We had a brief exchange through email, and I plan to conduct a Skype call with him in about a week's time. It will be great to hear from someone whose project is also about sourcing people's opinions on significant aspects of our world.

By next week, I need to make sure I'm set on what my execution will be; I have to create something in the end, after all. I also hope to continue sourcing answers for my "big question," because everyone has an opinion on what is worth representing us.

Ad/Graph Thesis – Reaching Out

Last week, I shared what my big idea was. Almost everyone I've talked with seems to enjoy the idea, and I've continued to dive into the topic.

I recently set up a survey that gauges people's stances on space in general and poses the big question: What would you send into space and why? The survey can be taken here, and I've already received some very interesting answers. Here a few of my favorites:

  • "September" by Earth, Wind & Fire, because I believe it to be the happiest song ever recorded."
     
  • "If I could send out a camera that would never lose its charge and record whatever it finds and transmits it back, that'd be cool. Or a Nickelback CD so we're sure alien life never visits us."
     
  • "A bottle of wine, because we all know it gets better with age. By the time it reaches anything able to consume it, that will be one expensive bottle."
     
  • "A seed of any sort, with directions on what it needs to grow and survive. If something was out there that was able to understand how to make the seed grow then we would more likely than not start a new species of plant somewhere and change everything about that somewhere."
     
  • "A box set of The X-Files... Milder deserves to know the truth. Or Liam Payne of One Direction, because he's my least favorite."

"September" by Earth, Wind & Fire.
© 2012 Sony Music Entertainment.

A box set of  The X-Files . Photo Credit: Amazon.

A box set of The X-Files. Photo Credit: Amazon.

Photo Credit: Wine Tours of the World.

Photo Credit: Wine Tours of the World.

Photo Credit: AllThingsD.

Photo Credit: AllThingsD.

I also stumbled across Earth Tapestry, which is a nonprofit that uses the internet to democratically determine the cultural significance of different landmarks and locations. They also have plans to preserve this information on the Moon in the form of a laser-engraved sapphire disk. This particular project is being coordinated in conjunction with Carnegie Mellon University. Best of all, William Alba, the founder and director of the project has an email listed, so I recently reached out to him. If all goes well, he could a great resource for this project.

The Metasphere Chamber that will securely house the Earth Tapestry data on the moon. Photo Credit: Earth Tapestry

The Metasphere Chamber that will securely house the Earth Tapestry data on the moon.
Photo Credit: Earth Tapestry

I was also recommended this article, which does an excellent job weighing the pros and cons of actively sending messages into space.

By my next blog post, I'll have submitted my official thesis proposal, and hopefully hear back from a few professionals in their respective fields.

This month has been particular busy, considering I've had to juggle my thesis, a One Show entry, a pretty ambitious music video, Directions, and a few other miscellaneous things. When this current week wraps up, I'll have a lot more time to dedicate to this!

New Heroes Presentation – Emails and Posters

Last week, I explained that I had made contact with Philipp Dettmer of Kurzgesagt, and planned on securing an interview time by this week. Sadly, he hasn't responded to the emails I've sent out, which has prompted me to contact Patrick Moore, one of other designers I had considered. After emailing him, I received an enthusiastic reply a mere hour later, so I have a hero after all! I'll be talking with him Wednesday evening.

In light of this development, I've pieced together a poster for the presentation (assuming he is interested in talking with me). As you can probably guess, I was largely inspired by his poster work for Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams:


Contacting busy designers has certainly had its challenges, but I'm glad that Patrick Moore responded so quickly. Within next week, I hope to have learned a great deal from this interview.